Odd Future: Exploring the Post-Apocalyptic Landscape of Station Eleven

NB: this book is best enjoyed with a Brooklyn Farmacy sundae     Five years ago, during my senior year of high school, I noticed a ton of the Middle School (sixth through eighth grade) students were touting a copy of a book called The Hunger Games. Though most self-respecting eighteen year olds don’t blindly purchase…

Four From ’14: Great Reads From Last Summer You May Have Missed

Though summer is now in full swing, and popular (soon to be blogged about) reads have been heavily recommended (The Rocks, Local Girls, The Hand That Feeds You, Hausfrau—these are all on my list), there are a few books I read and loved last summer that seemingly slipped through the cracks.             I’ll start with…

Navigable Neuroscience: Let’s Be Less Stupid by Patricia Marx

I do not think I stand alone in advocating the theory that students return from summer vacations with decreased intelligence. Come August, I find it difficult to hold a pen, let alone write a coherent sentence. Despite this concerning cognitive slide, I am always comforted by the fact that I will be returning to school…

Women in Wine Country: Stacking Up Similar Summer Stories

This June, during my plane-ride perusal of the glossy magazines I had chosen to accompany me on my journey across the Atlantic, I skipped directly to the tiny book recommendation blurbs of each magazine to find that nearly all of them wrote effusively about Laura Dave’s novel Eight Hundred Grapes. The book is about Georgia…

Breaking the Rules: The Best of Banned Books, Consolidated by Caroline

I am lucky enough to have many friends that enjoy reading as much as I do, and because their taste, though similarly discerning, differs from mine in certain aspects, I thought introducing some guest posters would be an excellent way to diversify the literary content on the blog. Today’s guest post comes from one of…

Unfinished Business: Popular Books I Could Not Get Through

I am so prone to judging books by their covers that it was actually the subject of my college application essay. With books like A Tale for the Time Being and Little Bee, I have not been disappointed. Two recent purchases this summer, though, and one from a while ago, proved my theory that a beautiful cover bodes…

Tom Perrotta Has Suburban Storytelling Down to a Science

   Long before The Leftovers was a disconcerting HBO series, it was the only passable book on the sparse shelves at the bookstore in the tiny town where I spend summers, which has since closed its doors. I was intrigued by the back jacket, which described a town in the wake of partial rapture of sorts; citizens, seemingly…

Reads, Ranked: Memoirs of The Best and Brightest Businesswomen

Though I tend towards fiction, when in search of an engaging and inspiring read, I’ll hit the memoirs section. Whether or not this is subconscious I am unsure, but I always end up picking up autobiographies of women. Perhaps it’s because I find the tale of, say, Tamara Mellon, more relatable and in line with my…

‘The Royal We’ is the Crown Jewel of Summer Reads

  I’ve been a longtime fan of Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan, the talented duo behind the cheeky website Go Fug Yourself, a blog dedicated to fashion policing, royals roundups, and television recaps. Though I was a bit old for it, I read their first book, Spoiled, in 2012 [yes, it’s ‘Teen Fiction’, and I was 19…so actually I was, albeit barely, within…

Kate Betts’ My Paris Dream: The Perfect Postgrad Read

    This May, in the days following my college graduation and preceding my post-graduate trip to Paris, a friend posted on Facebook about the release of Kate Betts’ memoir, My Paris Dream. I was instantly enticed by the beautiful cover – whenever I pull it out in public, I receive comments on the jacket without…