Slow Burn: Katie Kitamura’s ‘A Separation’

     When Katie Kitamura’s novel, A Separation, was heralded as a “literary Gone Girl,” I purchased it without hesitation. Upon completion of the book, I feel it is my duty to inform future readers that this description is entirely inaccurate. Regardless, the book is worth a read. Different from Gone Girl in almost every…

Need to While Away a Winter Weekend? Try a Cozy Mystery

  I had never heard the term “cozy mystery” until a few months back. I have made my love for mysteries fairly apparent on the site, but I always lumped them into one category. Imagine my surprise, then, when I discovered that within the mystery genre sits a small, adorable category described by Wikipedia as:…

2016’s Finest: ‘The Nix’ by Nathan Hill

  I wrote yesterday about breaking out of a reading rut, and after devouring the 620-page behemoth The Nix in a matter of two days, I think I can safely say the curse has been lifted. The ultimate measure of a book’s quality is, in my opinion, when you get close to the end and…

The Mothers Will Break You Out of Your Reading Rut

It was just about this time last year that I wrote about Fates and Furies, a book I didn’t know anything about, which managed to blow me away. I read a lot of books, and, sadly enough, it’s become increasingly rare for books to take me by surprise in the way Fates and Furies did….

Fall Fiction Favorites, Part 2

Though it is about a month late, as promised, the second half of my Fall Fiction Favorites series has arrived. I always tell myself I’m going to post more regularly…and, as evidenced by the fact that it’s been nearly a month, I haven’t yet been successful. Here’s hoping that 2017 is actually the year of…

Let Me Upgrade Ya: Better Versions of Popular Books

  Featuring two fall faves.              Unless you’re living under a rock that safely shields you from all things pop culture, it’s likely you’re aware of the phenomenon that was John Green’s The Fault In Our Stars and the movie adaptation that came along with it. If you had the finger on the pulse of…

At Hampden College, A Different Kind of Greek Life

  I’ve made no secret of the fact that I did not share the public affection for Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Goldfinch. Given the praise it received, though, I was determined to take a stab at some of her other work, in hope of discerning that it was the protagonist [quite possible] or…

Quick Picks: Everyone Brave is Forgiven

            NetGalley provided an advance copy of “Everyone Brave is Forgiven” for this review.  Image Credit   Everyone Brave is Forgiven is a novel told from two perspectives: that of Mary North, a beautiful scion of English society who is desperate to take part in the war effort, and Alistair…

Classic Rewind, Part II: Du Maurier’s ‘Rebecca’

  The first of my friends to read Rebecca did so in seventh grade—and she breathlessly recommended it to all those who would listen, claiming it among “the best books ever.” I wasn’t among those who heeded the recommendation immediately, but, having just finished the book, I have no idea what took me so long….

Literary Missteps at ‘The Lake House’

  As a rule, I stay away contemporary novels with flowery and ‘Victorian’ prose. I find them stilted attempts at approximating authors who haven’t been current in centuries. However, my mother gave Kate Morton’s The Lake House such a ringing endorsement that I couldn’t resist checking it out—plus, she had already downloaded it on her…

Want a Book that ‘Wows’ You?

My sister once pointed out to me that I have the distinct quirk of laughing and, almost imperceptibly, mumbling, “okay” every time I make a funny joke (almost constantly). I’ve pointed it out to a number of friends, who have confirmed it’s something I do—despite the fact that I almost never notice. Something I did…