Found in Translation: Katherine Pancol

    Given that I just woke up from a dream in which my blog domain name had expired and caused every post to vanish, I feel I am long overdue for a post—and today, I finally have something positive to report. I’ve mentioned my love for French authors in translation many a time (The…

Summer Reads Series, Pt. 1: Today Will Be Different

  After the emotional rollercoaster that was A Little Life, I felt a humorous palate cleanser was in perfect order. I was in Venice, California, and after numerous Google searches, a disheartening conversation with a salesgirl in Malibu that went something like, “bookstores? Umm, I don’t know, California doesn’t have that many. We have a…

Dispatches from the Present: Dissecting The Past and The Futures

  I haven’t exactly made my penchant for novels featuring crumbling British aristocratic families on this site a secret (see here and here…and here, and also that The Pursuit of Love, Sense & Sensibility, and Love in a Cold Climate are among my favorite books), so it should come as no surprise that one of…

An Exploration of England with Kazuo Ishiguro

I can’t decide if I love Kazuo Ishiguro or not. Never Let Me Go had me captivated through its final pages and thinking about it beyond that, but I couldn’t even get through The Buried Giant. I just finished The Remains of the Day and I’m feeling somewhere in between about it. Granted, I read…

Fall Fiction Favorites, Part 2

Though it is about a month late, as promised, the second half of my Fall Fiction Favorites series has arrived. I always tell myself I’m going to post more regularly…and, as evidenced by the fact that it’s been nearly a month, I haven’t yet been successful. Here’s hoping that 2017 is actually the year of…

Fall Fiction Favorites: Part I

            PART I: The Muse               I love Fiction books, but I’ve gotten to a point in life where I read so many of them, that for me to truly enjoy one, it needs to have “a hook.” Generally, that hook is a page-turning “thriller” element—but when it’s something altogether more unique—then all the…

Let Me Upgrade Ya: Better Versions of Popular Books

  Featuring two fall faves.              Unless you’re living under a rock that safely shields you from all things pop culture, it’s likely you’re aware of the phenomenon that was John Green’s The Fault In Our Stars and the movie adaptation that came along with it. If you had the finger on the pulse of…

Get Your Sh*t Together September, Literary Edition

    Unlike most people, January is not my preferred time for resolutions. Since January is my birthday month, I generally spend it indulging, reserving the New Year diets and detoxes for the rest of the world. For me, September is the month of motivation. Maybe it’s the Back-to-School organizers and calendars prominently featured in…

Summer Reads Series: Thriller Edition

I reviewed Ruth Ware’s In a Dark, Dark Wood back in October, thankful to the author for providing me with a book capable of capturing my attention while I sat in a stuffy jury duty waiting room for four days. The book was a captivating thriller that took place over the course of a weekend…

Summer Reads Series: Truly, Madly, Guilty

  Over the past three years, amidst the annual deluge of ‘beach reads’, Liane Moriarty has emerged as the reigning queen. While Moriarty has been publishing books since 2004, the witty Australian made headlines (or, at least, an impressive number of book recommendation columns within newspapers and magazines) with her 2013 novel The Husband’s Secret….

Million Dollar Baby: What is ‘The Girls’ Really Worth?

“Isn’t that the girl with the 2 million dollar book deal?” On more than one occasion, this question instantly followed the reveal that I was currently reading Emma Cline’s first novel, The Girls. Obvious implication: is the book actually worth 1 million dollars (unless I’m mistaken, the 2 million is for a two-book deal). During…

GUEST POST: Best Books I’ve Read for College Courses

By Charlotte Klein In my experience, reading for academic courses in high school was a make or break situation. Reading A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce for AP English Literature was a seemingly endless month of essays that analyzed symbolism, tone, themes — the whole shebang. Analyzing literary devices…